Updates from Joshua Chalifour Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Joshua Chalifour 11:48 on 27 July 2017 Permalink  

    Quite a read on the Financial Post about the present state of German philosophy. It tends to present a drive to make philosophy popularly accessed as problematic to profundity. In the end, the article offers examples showing that commercial success doesn’t necessarily indicate a lack of profundity. I tend to think there is room for both. We need much more of a general drive for people to want to think critically and engage with difficult or complex ideas and perspectives. If that can be initiated through even some less-profound popular works, I don’t see that as harmful. It doesn’t preclude people developing the more profound works, and may even help encourage a broader audience to read those too.

     
  • Joshua Chalifour 19:47 on 6 July 2017 Permalink
    Tags: art, typewriter   

    This person, Keira Rathbone, creates some really impressive art using a typewriter. The video shows her rolling the paper back-and-forth while striking keys harder or softer to create different layers of subtlety. The end results look a little like a cross between computer-made ASCII art and a hand-drawn sketch.

     
  • Joshua Chalifour 08:53 on 26 June 2017 Permalink
    Tags: career, humanities, tech, university   

    Techniques and rigour in thinking as well as a more interconnected approach toward understanding humanity remains necessary in high-tech. Simple, good read from the Harvard Business Review. I like this sentiment from the article “We should be careful not to let interdisciplinary jockeying make us cling to what we know best.”

     
  • Joshua Chalifour 08:56 on 3 May 2017 Permalink
    Tags: freedom of expression, press freedom   

    We need to always be vigilant for even the smallest restrictions or alterations to our freedom of expression and our essential rights. If we lapse we lose because hard-won successes in creating a good society don’t automatically remain. Without constant vigilance and maintenance our rights will erode, somewhat like our physical surroundings over time. Except, here we must be vigilant to those people that would trade our freedoms for short-sighted interests, perverse power, and neglect of the common well-being. Let’s make sure that we stay aware on World Press Freedom Day. Read more about the UNESCO 2017 themes. You should read this conversation with PEN International’s past president, John Ralston Saul, it says a lot.

     
  • Joshua Chalifour 11:56 on 20 March 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: computer, computer science, logic, philosophy   

    I remember thinking, when studying formal logic in my undergrad philosophy courses, that computer programming was essentially just another flavour of it. Since then, whenever I’ve read articles about the history of computing, I wonder why they invariably neglect to mention its crucial and rich philosophical origins. That’s what I love about this article in the Atlantic. I feel like it nails much of what is usually—and unfairly—missing.

     
  • Joshua Chalifour 08:19 on 6 June 2016 Permalink | Reply  

    Read Richard Polt’s Typology; A Phenomenology of Early Typewriters

    This is a super article on the phenomenology of typewriters. It looks at the evolution of the machine’s design and the way our world breaks down now with the passing of typing (on the typewriter).

     
  • Joshua Chalifour 15:14 on 18 November 2015 Permalink | Reply  

    The Canadian Library Association has posted its new statement on intellectual freedom http://bit.ly/1My5mZd (PDF). I like how they've approached the issue, stating:

    ".. the Canadian Library Association affirms that all persons in Canada have a fundamental right, subject only to the Constitution and the law, to have access to the full range of knowledge, imagination, ideas, and opinion, and to express their thoughts publicly."

    and

    That libraries have core responsibilities to

    "…safeguard and facilitate access to constitutionally protected expressions of knowledge, imagination, ideas, and opinion, including those which some individuals and groups consider unconventional, unpopular or unacceptable."

    "…safeguard and foster free expression and the right to safe and welcoming places and conditions."

    " safeguard and defend privacy in the individual’s pursuit of expressive content."

    and that

    "…libraries resist efforts to limit the exercise of these responsibilities while recognizing the right of criticism by individuals and groups."

     
  • Joshua Chalifour 21:00 on 17 November 2015 Permalink | Reply  

    Photos from today’s strike against QC’s austerity measures. The government needs to wake up and treat education properly. Take a lesson or two from Finland.

     
  • Joshua Chalifour 20:35 on 15 November 2015 Permalink | Reply  

    I've often thought of using phones as sucking us into a different space. Geiger's photos show it

    Filter: photo view all · PHOTOGRAPHY · ART/DESIGN · ANTOINE GEIGER · (+) · buy · Homesick · Dodekanisos · SUR-FAKE · Sous Couverture · Jeff Mills · Louvre · 0000 · Catherine · København. Dominika II · Dominika · recent · hangout · symbiose · details · dos anonymes · portraits anonymes …

     
  • Joshua Chalifour 20:28 on 15 November 2015 Permalink | Reply  

    A trunk of 2600 dead letters that were saved by a 17th century Netherlands postmaster are being digitized at http://brienne.org/. The history for how this came to be is interesting. That we have these now is essentially a side-effect of the delivery system of the time (and one person's ambition).

     
  • Joshua Chalifour 19:22 on 11 November 2015 Permalink | Reply  

    Libraries, supposedly quiet spaces, also produce a great deal of ambient sound, which makes for some pleasing and interesting recordings.

    Library Background Noise for Relaxation has over 150000 views on YouTube. The hour-long audio is, as described by its creator, “just a long audio clip of some background white noise from my recent trip to the library…lots of page flipping, typing, sighing and people doing things near by.

     
  • Joshua Chalifour 19:18 on 10 November 2015 Permalink | Reply  

    I've watched some Sesame Street now as a parent and I think I like it better than when I was a child. The Pox news incident is excellent. 

    The longest-running children’s show in U.S. TV history has raised some eyebrows since its debut on Nov. 10, 1969.

     
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